Custom Convertibles

Custom Convertibles

Custom Convertibles

Newport Convertible Engineering – NCE will design and engineer your automobiles, cars and vehicles to a Custom Convertibles.

NCE will customize any cars to a Custom Convertibles.

 

The Rolls-Royce Phantom 4-door convertible is an original design manufacturer(ODM) by NCE that debuted in 2011.

 

Newport Convertible engineering is currently the only US coach builder that designs, engineers and distributes the Jaguar XJ Convertibles throughout the world.

 

NCE will Design and Engineer your Mercedes Benz Maybach to a Power open-top Maybach Landaulet, NCE Edition!

Newport Convertible Engineering is an original design manufacturer(ODM) that designs and engineers authentic convertible tops on all brands of automobiles. NCE has recieved world wide recognition for their original convertible designs!

A convertible, also known as a “drop top” is a type of automobile of various automobile body styles that can ‘convert’ from an enclosed to an open-air vehicle.
Roof designs vary widely, with several common characteristics. Earlier convertibles features roofs that were demountable and/or detachable.
Often the roof is hinged and folds away, either into a recess behind the rear seats or into the boot or trunk of the vehicle.
The roof may operate either manually or automatically via hydraulic or electrical actuators, and the roof itself may be constructed of soft or rigid material.
Soft-tops are made of vinyl, canvas or other textile material, while hard-tops are made of steel, aluminum, plastic or other rigid materials.
Contemporary convertibles are known and marketed under several different terms due to the convergence of body styles over the years.
A soft-top convertible may also be referred to as a cabriolet or cabrio, although two-seater soft tops often retain the name roadster, referring to their body style.
Hard-tops are marketed under the terms coupé cabriolet, coupé convertible or simply retractable hardtop, while two-seaters more commonly use coupé roadster/roadster coupé.

Custom Convertible Vehicle

Newport Convertible engineering is currently the only US coach builder that designs, engineers and distributes the Lexus LX 570 Convertible Vehicles throughout the world.

 

Newport Convertible Engineering was the first US coach builder that designed, engineered and distributed limited Falcon Hunting Toyota Land Cruiser Convertible Vehicles throughout the world!

 

Newport Convertible Engineering was the first US coach builder that designed, engineered and distributed limited Falcon Hunting GMC YUKON Convertible Vehicles throughout the world!

Newport Convertible Engineering is an original design manufacturer(ODM) that designs and engineers authentic convertible tops on all brands of automobiles.
NCE has recieved world wide recognition for their original convertible designs.

A convertible vehicle, also known as a “drop top vehicle” is a type of vehicle of various vehicle body styles that can ‘convert’ from an enclosed to an open-air vehicle.
Roof designs vary widely, with several common characteristics. Earlier convertibles features roofs that were demountable and/or detachable.
Often the roof is hinged and folds away, either into a recess behind the rear seats or into the boot or trunk of the vehicle.
The roof may operate either manually or automatically via hydraulic or electrical actuators, and the roof itself may be constructed of soft or rigid material.
Soft-tops are made of vinyl, canvas or other textile material, while hard-tops are made of steel, aluminum, plastic or other rigid materials.
Contemporary convertibles are known and marketed under several different terms due to the convergence of body styles over the years.
A soft-top convertible vehicle may also be referred to as a cabriolet or cabrio, although two-seater soft tops often retain the name roadster, referring to their body style.
Hard-top vehicles are marketed under the terms coupé cabriolet, coupé convertible or simply retractable hardtop, while two-seaters more commonly use coupé roadster/roadster coupé

Custom Convertibles

The Rolls-Royce Phantom 4-door convertible is an original design manufacturer(ODM) by NCE that debuted in 2011.

Newport Convertible engineering is currently the only US coach builder that designs, engineers and distributes the Rolls Royce Phantom 4-door Convertibles throughout the world.

Newport Convertible Engineering creates custom convertibles, and specializedconvertible tops for Hummer, Chrysler, Dodge, Limousines, Coupes, Sedans, 

American car manufacturers stopped making convertibles in-house in 1976. As fewer and fewer convertibles remained available to U.S. buyers (mid-1970s to mid-1980s), an aftermarket cottage industry grew for new cars to be converted into convertibles because there were still buyers who wanted them. The few European convertibles that were available was not enough to placate demand. Everything from Firebirds to Celicas, Continentals to Cutlass Cieras were modified into convertibles. Tens of thousands of cars were converted by several dozen coachbuilders across the country.

Why were they called coachbuilders? Because it was a big job, and these modern cars did not have enough structural integrity to withstand the loss of the roof structure. The coachbuilder would have to re-engineer the structure of the car, often adding hundreds of pounds of steel, prior to removing the roof and fitting the convertible mechanism. They would then have to make new interior and exterior trim for all the places that they had to cut, and make it look, feel, and drive like it was meant to be a convertible. It would also have to be safe. It was no small task. Coachbuilding was a trade that had been around for centuries. Before there were cars, there were horse drawn coaches, and they were all made by hand. With the advent of the automobile, the coachbuilders adapted to the changing times, and made bodies for cars. These car bodies were made by hand, out of wood and later steel, and mounted on to the automobile frame. The coachbuilder would be responsible for the interior as well. Eventually car companies started making their own pressed steel bodies. The only remaining market for coachbuilders was the very expensive cars like Duesenburgs, Rolls Royces, and the biggest Packards. This work eventually died down too, but there would always be coachbuilders around. The firm of Mulliner Park Ward, for example, would build Corniche bodies for Rolls Royce and Bentley until 1995. Most modern day coachbuilders are in the business of modifying car bodies. They modify cars into hearses, ambulances, flower cars, stretch limousines, and of course convertibles.
These coachbuilding companies often marketed to new car dealerships, but they usually did not work for, or in conjunction with the car manufacturer. There were exceptions, however. Newport Convertible Engineering (NCE), a company which has converted over 10,000 cars, has had official relationships with many car companies. NCE’s products are of such high quality that many manufacturers retain them to create convertibles. The volume of convertible sales is low enough that these manufacturers can’t justify the cost of tooling up their own factories to make convertibles in-house like they used to. For example, General Motors sold Camaro and Firebird Convertibles from 1987 to 1992, which were sold in Chevrolet and Pontiac dealerships. In this case, it was handled in two different ways. Some of them were sold as regular production “factory convertibles.” GM handled the logistics of these “factory” conversions and sold the cars to dealers under the RPO system (regular production option). Even though the car was bought from Chevrolet directly as a convertible, it was in fact a converted car, and had a placard from the coachbuilder in the door jamb.
Sometimes GM chose not to offer RPO convertibles. For example, in 1987, when the first RPO Camaro ragtops became available, Pontiac wanted to have Firebird ragtops too, but they were so heavy that they would have raised Pontiac’s CAFE (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) number too high. To get around this problem, they were sold as coachbuilt special editions, and as such, their increased fuel consumption would not be figured into Pontiac’s CAFE number. Everything was done the same as the RPO Camaros except the paperwork. Instead of ordering a convertible directly from GM, the dealer would order the car as a t-top. It would be drop shipped to the coachbuilder, and converted right along side the regular production Camaros, which had also been built as t-top cars originally. So it is a subtle distinction, the only real difference being who got billed for the work, (the dealer or the manufacturer) and whether or not it was included in the CAFE calculations. It was win-win. Customers got their convertibles and Pontiac got their low CAFE rating. Pontiac eventually redesigned the Firebird, reducing fuel consumption enough to offer their own RPO convertibles in 1991.[2]
A new-car dealership could contract with any aftermarket company to add any option they wanted to add to a car, as long as it did not compromise the structural integrity or cause warranty problems on that car. Options like roof-racks, sunroofs, leather interiors, spoilers, rustproofing and all sorts of things could be done to a new car, even if the car manufacturer had nothing to do with that product or conversion. The conversion van phenomenon is a very similar process. The convertible conversion was billed as a dealer option that was ordered by the new car dealership (or could be ordered privately if you already owned the car) just like rustproofing or custom pin striping could be ordered for a car by the dealership. As far as a car manufacturer was concerned, as long as the car was converted in a way that did not negatively compromise the car to cause warranty problems, then the new car dealership could do, or have done, whatever they wanted to do. These conversions are not considered OEM or factory options. Conversions done before the final sale to the consumer, for/by the new car dealership are considered dealer options. All coach convertible conversions, Convertible Vehicles sold directly to the private car owner are considered
“aftermarket” conversions.
Return of the factory convertible
As the coachbuilt convertible cottage industry continued to grow, it became obvious to the car manufacturers that it was again time for them to produce new convertibles. For the 1982 model year, the Chrysler LeBaron, Dodge 400 and Buick Riviera convertibles were available to new car shoppers as a factory option. The Ford Mustang, Chevy Cavalier & Pontiac Sunbird followed for the 1983 model year, and the Cadillac Eldorado & Toyota Celica followed for 1984. Even though these new factory convertibles were offered by the manufacturer, they were still built as hardtops, then shipped to a coach company for modification into a convertible. The cars were then sent to dealerships by the original manufacturer. Even though the conversion process was the same, because these convertibles were provided to the dealership directly from the car manufacturer, they are considered factory original. In time, the car manufacturers were able to return the actual construction and engineering of some of its convertibles back to the factory. Companies like American Specialty Cars continue to build convertibles for manufacturers, both with soft tops and with retractable hard tops. They are responsible for the Toyota Camry Solara convertible and BMW Z3, as well as countless others.

Coach-built Convertible Vehicles lives on
Even though the car manufacturers have gotten back into the business of building convertibles, there will always be a market for specialty coach convertibles. Many convertibles have been built to fill a niche in the market. Coach convertibles like the ’84-’87 NCE Honda CRX Spyder and the ’83-’90 NCE Mercedes SEC convertible were successful, even while competing in a market full of factory convertibles. Even today, coach builders are able to sell limited numbers of coach convertibles to customers that want something a little different.

Conversions of Japanese products (for the U.S. market)
Nissan 300ZX Newport Convertible Engineering (1984–1988,1990–1991).
Toyota MR2 Newport Convertible Engineering (1986–1987)
Honda CRX Newport Convertible Engineering (1984–1987)
Acura Legend Newport Convertible Engineering (1988–1989)
Acura NSX Newport Convertible Engineering (1991)
Mazda RX-7 Newport Convertible Engineering(1984-1985), Pacific Avatar (Ultima, 1979–1985), Global Coach (1981–1983)

Mitsubishi 3000GT/Dodge Stealth Newport Convertible Engineering (1991-1992), R. Straman Company (1991–1992).

Conversions of European products (for the U.S. market)
Mercedes 280CE/300CE Coupe Newport Convertible Engineering(1984-1991), R. Straman Company (1984–1988, 35 built),
Mercedes 380SEC/500SEC/560SEC Coupe Newport Engineering (1984–1991), R. Straman Company (1983–1990)
Porsche 924 Newport Convertible Engineering (1984-1987), Carelli Autoworks (1983)
Porsche 928 Newport Convertible Engineering (1984-1987), Carelli Autoworks (1980)

BMW 8-Series Newport Convertible Engineering (1992)
Volkswagen New Beetle Newport Convertible Engineering (1998-1999).
Rolls Royce Silver Spirit/Silver Spur Convertible Newport Convertible Engineering (1984–1989).

Conversions for the Australian market
Chevrolet Camaro Newport Convertible Engineering (1983-1988)

Conversions for the European market
Mercedes 380SEC/500SEC/560SEC Coupe Newport Convertible Engineering (1982–1991)

Current conversions
Cadillac DTS Newport Convertible Engineering (2001–2009)
Cadillac CTS Newport Convertible Engineering (2008–2009), Newport Eng. (2003)
Chevrolet Camaro Newport Convertible Engineering (2010)
Chrysler 300 Newport Convertible Engineering (2005–2009)
Dodge Charger Newport Convertible Engineering (2007–2009)
Dodge Challenger Newport Convertible Engineering (2008–2011)
Toyota Prius Newport Convertible Engineering (2008–2009)
Toyota FJ Cruiser Newport Convertible Engineering (2007–2009)
Mini Cooper S Newport Convertible Engineering (2002)
Chrysler PT Cruiser Newport Convertible Engineering (2002)
Subaru Impreza WRX STi Newport Convertible Engineering (2011)

Custom Convertibles

Newport Convertible Engineering was the first US coach builder that designed, engineered and distributed limited Mercedes Benz CL Convertibles throughout the world!

Newport Convertible engineering is currently the only US coach builder that designs, engineers and distributes the Mercedes Benz CL Convertibles throughout the world.

Newport Convertible Engineering is an original design manufacturer(ODM) that designs and engineers authentic convertible tops on all brands of automobiles. NCE has recieved world wide recognition for their original convertible designs, especially on Mercedes Benz convertibles.

Newport Convertible Engineering creates custom convertibles, and specialized convertible tops for Hummer, Chrysler, Dodge, Limousines, Coupes, Sedans, …

American car manufacturers stopped making convertibles in-house in 1976. As fewer and fewer convertibles remained available to U.S. buyers (mid-1970s to mid-1980s), an aftermarket cottage industry grew for new cars to be converted into convertibles because there were still buyers who wanted them. The few European convertibles that were available was not enough to placate demand. Everything from Firebirds to Celicas, Continentals to Cutlass Cieras were modified into convertibles. Tens of thousands of cars were converted by several dozen coachbuilders across the country.
Why were they called coach builders? Because it was a big job, and these modern cars did not have enough structural integrity to withstand the loss of the roof structure. The coachbuilder would have to re-engineer the structure of the Convertible Vehicles, often adding hundreds of pounds of steel, prior to removing the roof and fitting the convertible mechanism. They would then have to make new interior and exterior trim for all the places that they had to cut, and make it look, feel, and drive like it was meant to be a convertible. It would also have to be safe. It was no small task. Coach building was a trade that had been around for centuries. Before there were cars, there were horse drawn coaches, and they were all made by hand. With the advent of the automobile, the coach builders adapted to the changing times, and made bodies for cars. These car bodies were made by hand, out of wood and later steel, and mounted on to the automobile frame. The coach builder would be responsible for the interior as well. Eventually car companies started making their own pressed steel bodies. The only remaining market for coach builders was the very expensive cars like Duesenburgs, Rolls Royces, and the biggest Packards. This work eventually died down too, but there would always be coach builders around. The firm of Mulliner Park Ward, for example, would build Corniche bodies for Rolls Royce and Bentley until 1995. Most modern day coach builders are in the business of modifying car bodies. They modify cars into hearses, ambulances, flower cars, stretch limousines, and of course convertibles.
These coach building companies often marketed Convertible Vehicles to a new car dealerships, but they usually did not work for, or in conjunction with the car manufacturer. There were exceptions, however. Newport Convertible Engineering (NCE), a company which has converted over 10,000 cars, has had official relationships with many car companies. NCE’s products are of such high quality that many manufacturers retain them to create convertibles. The volume of convertible sales is low enough that these manufacturers can’t justify the cost of tooling up their own factories to make convertibles in-house like they used to. For example, General Motors sold Camaro and Firebird Convertibles from 1987 to 1992, which were sold in Chevrolet and Pontiac dealerships. In this case, it was handled in two different ways. Some of them were sold as regular production “factory convertibles.” GM handled the logistics of these “factory” conversions and sold the cars to dealers under the RPO system (regular production option). Even though the car was bought from Chevrolet directly as a convertible, it was in fact a converted car/ Convertible Vehicles, and had a placard from the coach builder in the door jamb.

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